Mom, teacher, artist. Older than dirt and easily entertained.
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Reblogged from ash-of-the-loam  1,013 notes
cheshirelibrary:

13 Signs You Might Be Living in a Gothic Novel
[via Barnes & Noble Book Blog]
If you’ve started to suspect that the drafty cathedral your family has called home for countless centuries may in fact be the setting of a bona fide gothic novel, here are 13 spooky ways to tell for sure:
1. Either there are no clocks in your house, or your house is filled with clocks…but they’re all set to different times.
2. Also, though you refer to it as “your house,” it’s actually one of the following: a dilapidated mansion, a moldering manor, or a crumbling castle with no plumbing to speak of. Also, the wind is always howling outside.
3. People around you are regularly tumbling dramatically down stairs and breaking all of their bones.
4. You can tell that things are starting to get kind of serious with the guy you’ve been seeing because he’s started talking about how you two are actually one person and how if you’re ever separated by death he will throw himself into your open grave and be buried alive with you. Also, you suspect that the two of you might be somehow related. Best not to dwell.
5. Flickering candles everywhere.
6. Three or more friends or family members have wasted away from mysterious fevers, but always looked great doing it.
7. Instead of watching TV, you plot revenge.
8. Every time you’re about to finally fall into bed with the long-term object of your obsession, a gust of wind ablows the French doors open, a candle gutters out, and one of you immediately begins to waste away from a mysterious fever.
9. Your living quarters are no great shakes, but you’ve noticed that going outside is somehow always a bad idea.
10. 20% of the meals served and eaten in your house are laced with some kind of drug or poison.
11. People are constantly being locked in their rooms or locking other people in their rooms without anybody ever batting an eye over it.
12. Most of the marriages of the couples around you were motivated by vengeance.
13. An attic without an insane person chained up in it for years just doesn’t have that lived-in feeling. Same goes for cellars, and the odd cupola.

cheshirelibrary:

13 Signs You Might Be Living in a Gothic Novel

[via Barnes & Noble Book Blog]

If you’ve started to suspect that the drafty cathedral your family has called home for countless centuries may in fact be the setting of a bona fide gothic novel, here are 13 spooky ways to tell for sure:

1. Either there are no clocks in your house, or your house is filled with clocks…but they’re all set to different times.

2. Also, though you refer to it as “your house,” it’s actually one of the following: a dilapidated mansion, a moldering manor, or a crumbling castle with no plumbing to speak of. Also, the wind is always howling outside.

3. People around you are regularly tumbling dramatically down stairs and breaking all of their bones.

4. You can tell that things are starting to get kind of serious with the guy you’ve been seeing because he’s started talking about how you two are actually one person and how if you’re ever separated by death he will throw himself into your open grave and be buried alive with you. Also, you suspect that the two of you might be somehow related. Best not to dwell.

5. Flickering candles everywhere.

6. Three or more friends or family members have wasted away from mysterious fevers, but always looked great doing it.

7. Instead of watching TV, you plot revenge.

8. Every time you’re about to finally fall into bed with the long-term object of your obsession, a gust of wind ablows the French doors open, a candle gutters out, and one of you immediately begins to waste away from a mysterious fever.

9. Your living quarters are no great shakes, but you’ve noticed that going outside is somehow always a bad idea.

10. 20% of the meals served and eaten in your house are laced with some kind of drug or poison.

11. People are constantly being locked in their rooms or locking other people in their rooms without anybody ever batting an eye over it.

12. Most of the marriages of the couples around you were motivated by vengeance.

13. An attic without an insane person chained up in it for years just doesn’t have that lived-in feeling. Same goes for cellars, and the odd cupola.

Reblogged from skunkbear  43 notes
skunkbear:

People tell me all the time — “Adam, your occasional wolverine news updates, while informative, lack a certain something. What I really want to see is a person dressed up as a wolverine, sort of rapping wolverine facts and dancing with people dressed up as other woodland animals.”
Well, thank goodness for the Canadians.

(I enjoy that this video is Copyright “Her Majesty the Queen.” I like to think it was her idea.)

Well, that was weird.  So proud to be Canadian right now…

skunkbear:

People tell me all the time — “Adam, your occasional wolverine news updates, while informative, lack a certain something. What I really want to see is a person dressed up as a wolverine, sort of rapping wolverine facts and dancing with people dressed up as other woodland animals.”

Well, thank goodness for the Canadians.

(I enjoy that this video is Copyright “Her Majesty the Queen.” I like to think it was her idea.)

Well, that was weird.  So proud to be Canadian right now…

Reblogged from gjmueller  25 notes
gjmueller:

Students Riding on Coattails during Group Work? Five Simple Ideas to Try
Design a group project in which the students work in phases.
Develop an element of the project that allows group members to make their own choices.
Within a group project, include a component requiring individual students to submit non-onerous individual work.
Devote a segment (30 minutes or so) during class before all group projects begin to implement two important steps.
Prepare students to expect the unexpected.

gjmueller:

Students Riding on Coattails during Group Work? Five Simple Ideas to Try

  1. Design a group project in which the students work in phases.
  2. Develop an element of the project that allows group members to make their own choices.
  3. Within a group project, include a component requiring individual students to submit non-onerous individual work.
  4. Devote a segment (30 minutes or so) during class before all group projects begin to implement two important steps.
  5. Prepare students to expect the unexpected.